Introduced in 1970, the Superbird by Plymouth was a response to Dodge’s 1969 Charger Daytona. Acting as a homologation special, it aimed to compete with its “winged warrior” counterpart on NASCAR tracks.

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The Superbird closely resembled the Dodge Charger Daytona, featuring minimal cosmetic changes. Plymouth expanded its engine options, adding a six-barrel variant to the existing 440-cubic-inch RB and 426-cubic-inch HEMI.

Unlike the successful Charger Daytona, Superbirds faced challenges. Some models remained unsold until 1972, with a few even converted to Road Runner specifications. Despite nearly 2,000 units produced, the Superbird’s value lagged behind its Dodge counterpart.

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While the Superbird hasn’t reached the Daytona’s value, HEMI-powered Superbirds are approaching million-dollar status. The 440 variants, especially unrestored survivors, can command prices exceeding $400,000 at auctions.

At the 2023 Mopars With Big Daddy show, a Tor Red Superbird garnered attention. Unrestored for over 50 years, this model retained original drivetrain components, including the numbers-matching 440-cubic-inch Six-Barrel V8 and automatic transmission.

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Despite a paint refresh a few years ago, this Superbird remains authentic. It stands out as one of only 716 with the six-barrel 440 V8. The automatic transmission and column shifter further narrow its production to one of 408 units.

The Tor Red paint adds to the rarity, constituting approximately 14% of all Superbirds. While precise figures are unavailable, estimates suggest that only around 57 Superbirds with the 440 Six-Barrel/automatic combo and a Tor Red exterior were produced.

This Superbird, though statistically rare, exemplifies the enduring appeal of Mopar classics. After more than 50 years, it remains a stunning and drivable testament to a bygone era.

 

# FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

**Q1: How many Superbirds were produced?**
A1: Nearly 2,000 Superbirds were built, making them more common than their Dodge counterpart, the Charger Daytona.

**Q2: Why did Superbirds face challenges in sales?**
A2: Unlike the successful Charger Daytona, Superbirds struggled to sell, with some remaining on showroom floors until 1972. Some were even converted to Road Runner specs.

**Q3: What is the current value of Superbirds?**
A3: HEMI-powered Superbirds are approaching million-dollar status, while unrestored 440 variants can fetch over $400,000 at public auctions.

**Q4: What makes the Tor Red Superbird at the Mopars With Big Daddy show unique?**
A4: The Tor Red Superbird is one of only 716 with the six-barrel 440 V8, and its Tor Red exterior contributes to its rarity, with an estimated 57 units featuring this specific combination.

**Q5: Is the showcased Superbird entirely original?**
A5: While the Tor Red paint received a refresh, the showcased Superbird retains original drivetrain components, including the numbers-matching 440-cubic-inch Six-Barrel V8 and automatic transmission.

**Q6: How many Superbirds with the six-barrel 440/automatic combo and Tor Red exterior were estimated to be produced?**
A6: While exact figures are unavailable, estimates suggest that around 57 Superbirds with the 440 Six-Barrel/automatic combo and a Tor Red exterior were produced.

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